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  • SENEGAL: Government exempts renewable energy equipment from VAT
  • AFRICA: AFSIA webinar on solar energy use in agriculture
  • Ethiopia breaking ground in geothermal vision
  • NAMIBIA: Green bond raises $4 million for clean energy
  • Using solar home systems to financially empower rural Uganda
  • Tanzania plans to construct hydropower plants and transmission lines
  • KENYA: KenGen to install solar power plants in the reservoirs of 3 dams
  • ZIMBABWE: ZINWA to finance rehabilitation of Wenimbe Dam
  • BURUNDI: WK to carry out feasibility studies for 2 hydropower projects by Tembo Power
  • ESWATINI: GoParity co-finances off-grid solar power plant at Siteki Hospital
  • TOGO: Biogas reference laboratory to be built at Lomé University
  • SIERRA LEONE: InfraCo Africa finances Bumbuna II Hydroelectric Project with $6 million
  • GHANA: Nek aims to produce 1,000 MW of wind power to boost the grid
  • EGYPT: Schneider Electric to upgrade power grid with digital technology
  • BENIN: 11 companies selected for 8 mini-solar grids projects in rural areas
  • MAURITIUS: Bonds to finance sustainable development projects
  • CHAD: UNDP plans to equip 150 health centres with solar photovoltaic systems
  • Gambia Allocated U.S.$66 Million to Improve Electricity
  • TUNISIA: To integrate the International Solar Alliance (ASI)
  • MOROCCO/MAURITANIA: how solar and wind power are making a leap in electricity mixes

  • SENEGAL: Government exempts renewable energy equipment from VAT

    The Senegalese Ministry of Oil and Energy has recently decided to exempt equipments for the production of renewable energies such as solar, wind and biogas from VAT (value added tax). The government's measure is aimed at accelerating the electrification of rural areas in Senegal. The move has been a much-heard measure by operators in the renewable energy sector in Senegal. The Senegalese Ministry of Oil and Energy has issued a list of 22 electricity and biogas production facilities that are exempt from VAT (value added tax). The VAT exemption concerns the solar energy sector with equipment such as the photovoltaic solar panel, the solar thermal collector or panel, the solar inverter, the solar battery, the solar water heater kit, the charge regulator, the solar lamp kit, the solar street lamp (comprising a solar panel, a battery and a lantern, editor’s note) as well as the solar pumping kit comprising a solar panel, a controller and a pump. Among the green energy production components exempted from the VAT by the Senegalese authorities are the tower, the blade, the rotor, the nacelle and the hub. This equipment is essential in the construction of wind farms. The exemption from import VAT also applies to biogas production equipment such as the biogas stove, biogas flow analyser, prefabricated bio-digester, biogas pump, desulphurisation unit, water trap, biogas generator and substrate mixing unit.

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    AFRICA: AFSIA webinar on solar energy use in agriculture

    The African Solar Industry Association (AFSIA) is organising on Thursday, August 6, 2020 an online seminar on the use of solar energy in the agriculture sector in Africa. The webinar will bring together experts who will exchange on new technologies, as well as the financing of solar photovoltaic systems for agriculture. With a population estimated by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) at 1.3055 billion people (2019), Africa is experiencing rapid population growth and some experts believe that Africa’s population could double by 2050. Africa should rely more on agriculture to meet the food needs of its population. The coronavirus health crisis and subsequent travel restrictions show the drawbacks of relying on food exports. To increase and secure food production, Africa should invest in more environmentally friendly agriculture. This includes the integration of solar energy into environmentally friendly agricultural production processes. It is to highlight the applications of solar energy in agriculture that the African Solar Industry Association (AFSIA) is organizing a webinar on Thursday, August 6, 2020. This webinar will also be an opportunity to discover the latest technologies and innovations used to improve agricultural yields through the use of solar energy. The experts who will take part in the online event will also discuss business models of “successful companies that help farmers get more out of their land”. The organization of this webinar also demonstrates the progressive democratization of solar energy in agriculture in Africa.


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    Ethiopia breaking ground in geothermal vision

    Ethiopia currently has an electricity access rate of 45%, with 11% of its population already having access through decentralised solutions. Though the country is heavily reliant on hydropower, government plans to exploit 1,000MW of geothermal potential by 2030. Ethiopia started long-term geothermal exploration in 1969. Since the late 1970s, geoscientific surveys mostly comprising geology, geochemistry, and geophysics, were carried out, from south to north, leading to prospective projects at Abaya, Corbetti, Aluto Langano, Tulu Moye and Tendaho (Teklemariam and Beyene, 2005). Let’s explore two projects that have made the most progress. Corbetti and Tulu Moye, located in the Rift Valley, are expected to produce a combined 1,000MW of power when they reach full completion. In 2017, the government signed a $4 billion contract for the construction of Corbetti. “No doubt the success of this effort will have a significant impact on the country’s future economic well-being,” noted former chief executive of Ethiopian Electric Power (EEP), Azeb Asnake. The equity investors in the Corbetti project include the Paris-based asset manager Meridiam, Africa Renewable Energy Fund, and InfraCo Africa – funds that focus on infrastructure investment.


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    NAMIBIA: Green bond raises $4 million for clean energy

    The first green bond listed on the Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX) has raised more than US$4 million (N$66 million) to finance renewable energy projects in the country. According to the Namibian commercial bank in its green impact report, the first green bond listed on the Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX), issued in December 2018 by Bank Windhoek, was a success. The bank obtained more than 4 million USD (N$66 million) in the form of market debt to finance renewable energy projects, thereby helping to reduce the carbon footprint of this southern African country. According to Bank Windhoek’s report published in July 2020, the N$66 million was raised within 12 months of the initial issuance of the green bonds. Bank Windhoek reports that several solar photovoltaic projects have been financed with the funds raised. These include the installation of three solar photovoltaic systems to improve agricultural production in Namibia. The solar photovoltaic systems at various locations in the country have a capacity of 69.8 kWp and can produce up to 123,570 kWh of electricity per year. According to the analysis paper produced by the Namibian Commercial Bank, several solar systems have also been connected to the grid of the utility Namibia Power Corporation (Nampower). The other project financed by Bank Windhoek’s green bond is the installation of a solar photovoltaic system in Okatope in the Ohangwena region of northern Namibia. According to Bank Windhoek’s report, the installation has a capacity of 5.74 MWp and will produce 14.6 million kWh of electricity while reducing carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2) emissions by 14,350 tonnes. The Okatope solar project has absorbed N$57.2 million of the funds raised by the green bond.


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    Using solar home systems to financially empower rural Uganda

    Millions of people in rural Uganda are set to access reliable and cheap electricity for the first time under a new off-grid solar scheme. ENGIE through its solar home systems company Fenix International will be scaling up off-grid solar technology deployment with the European Investment Bank (EIB) providing the critical funding. EIB’s involvement addresses the biggest barrier faced by 80% of Ugandans without access to electricity – solving the last mile challenge of families unable to afford the initial upfront cost of electricity for the home. EIB will provide a $12,5 million loan to support the deployment of 240,000 high-quality solar home systems in Uganda by Fenix International, which a subsidiary of ENGIE. Fenix will use a pay-as-you-go model, which will allow families to repay the upfront equipment costs of the solar home systems over years at less than 20 cents (in US dollar terms) a day. The financing via EIB will also allow repayments for systems purchased in US dollars, to be made in Ugandan shillings. Previously currency fluctuations have been a major hindrance to Ugandans without access to foreign currency, seeking clean affordable clean energy solutions. Managing Director Uganda for Fenix, Daniel Willette, said they are very proud to be the latest national off-grid power operation in Africa to be supported by EIB. “Providing hundreds of thousands of new solar home systems through the PAYGO model will allow our Ugandan team to transform communities across the country,” said Willette.


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    Tanzania plans to construct hydropower plants and transmission lines

    Tanzania Electric Supply Company Limited (TANESCO) has awarded Multiconsult consultancy contracts for the 222MW Rumakali and 358MW Ruhudji Hydropower and transmission lines projects in Tanzania. Multiconsult will undertake feasibility studies, prepare the conceptual design and tender documents, and conduct environmental and social impact assessment studies for the two proposed hydropower projects and associated transmission lines. The Rumakali and Rhuhudji projects are both located in the Njombe region and could double the total installed hydropower capacity in Tanzania, from 562MW to 1,142MW. “We are proud to participate in the energy development in Tanzania by being awarded these large and important projects,” said Hilde Gillebo, EVP Energy in Multiconsult. “The Rumakali and Ruhudji hydropower projects will be significant in meeting the country’s increasing electricity demand. Despite a huge hydropower and solar potential, only an estimated 36.6% of the population in Tanzania currently has access to electricity. The Tanzania government has set aggressive electrification targets, aiming to achieve 75% electrification by 2035.” The projects are scheduled to start immediately and are planned to be completed by the third quarter of 2021. Norplan Tanzania and Tanzania Photomap will act as subcontractors to Multiconsult, according to a press release. With specialist competence on renewable energy, Multiconsult has delivered services to a wide portfolio of renewable energy projects in Tanzania. The company’s other current engagements in the country include various transmission and distribution and electrification projects, including a plan for rural electrification, water resource management projects and solar projects.


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    KENYA: KenGen to install solar power plants in the reservoirs of 3 dams

    The Norwegian company Multiconsult recently indicated that it will conduct studies to determine the potential for several floating solar power plants in the basins of three hydroelectric dams owned by Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen). Hybridisation of several hydropower dams is being seriously considered in Kenya. The details of this initiative will undoubtedly be known at the end of the technical studies commissioned by the Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen). It has awarded the contract to Multiconsult, an engineering consultancy firm based in Oslo, Norway. The studies will be carried out in the Kamburu, Kiambere and Turkwell hydroelectric dam basins. The reservoirs of these dams are very large. The Kamburu dam, for example, covers an area of 60 km² and contains 123,000,000 m³ of water on which solar panels can be installed. Multiconsult’s mission is to assess the social, environmental and climatic aspects, as well as the risks associated with the existence of floating solar power plants in the basins of these hydroelectric dams. “The hybridization of hydroelectric dams with floating solar power plants will facilitate the appropriate and cost-effective management of electricity and water,” says Syed Ali, Multiconsult’s senior consultant and project manager. According to this specialist, Kenya has an abundant resource of solar energy. This renewable energy source can be used during the day when the sun is abundant. Hydroelectric power stations will take over during the evening peak hours.


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    ZIMBABWE: ZINWA to finance rehabilitation of Wenimbe Dam

    The Zimbabwe National Water Authority (ZINWA) has recently proposed to the State of Zimbabwe an estimated budget for the implementation of the Wenimbe Hydroelectric Dam Rehabilitation Project at Marondera in Mashonaland Province. ZINWA will finance the project to the tune of over US$946,000 (over Z$342.4 million). Rehabilitation work on the Wenimbe hydroelectric dam at Marondera in Zimbabwe’s Mashonaland province could soon start. The Zimbabwe National Water Authority (ZINWA) has recently suggested to the government of this East African country an estimated budget for the implementation of the project. More than US$946,000 (over $342.4 million Zimbabwean dollars) will be required. The Wenimbe Dam Water Infrastructure Rehabilitation Project is a “necessity” for Marondela, as the town’s main water source is heavily “polluted”. This situation is caused by sewage that discharges into the dam’s basin. Currently, Wenimbe has two water pumping stations and a 16 km pipeline from the dam to the drinking water plant. Normally, the pumping capacity of the installations is 540 m³ per hour. Currently, the actual production is only 270 m³ per hour. The reason for this low efficiency is that the Wenimbe dam has been operating for several years with only one set of pumps. “If we can get all four pumps at the two stations of the dam to work, we will be able to approach the bar of 540 m³ of water produced per hour,” says Colleta Tundu, an engineer from ZINWA.


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    BURUNDI: WK to carry out feasibility studies for 2 hydropower projects by Tembo Power

    The power producer Tembo Power has extended its partnership with the South African company WK Construction for its Dama and Siguvyaye hydroelectric projects in Burundi. WK Construction will carry out detailed studies for the construction of these plants, with the aim of feeding 19.5 MW into Burundi's national electricity grid. As the Dama and Siguvyaye hydropower projects in Burundi approach financial close, the developer Tembo Power announces the extension of its partnership with WK Construction, now responsible for carrying out detailed studies for two hydroelectric projects. Under the new agreement, the company has “preferred contractor status” to provide engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) services for the future facilities. With an expected capacity of 7.5 MW, the Dama hydropower project will result in the construction of a run-of-river power plant in the Rumonge province in southwestern Burundi. The electricity generated by this plant will be evacuated via a 12 km high-voltage line. The Siguvyaye hydroelectric project is being developed in the wake of the Dama project. It is located in the Bururi province in the south-west of Burundi with an expected capacity of 12 MW. The run-of-river power plant will generate electricity via a 13 km high-voltage line. Feasibility studies (geotechnical and geophysical studies) for both projects have already been carried out by Aurecon, a South African engineering company. The Dama and Siguvyaye hydroelectric projects will require an overall investment of $50 million. As part of the expanded partnership between the project developer and WK Construction, its investment subsidiary WK Power, will retain a minority stake in both projects. According to Tembo Power, the extension of the partnership with WK Construction confirms the technical and economic viability of the projects and demonstrates the success of the partnership for the construction of the Kaptis hydropower plant (15 MW) in Kenya. Tembo Power was primarily responsible for the overall development, while WK Construction provided technical expertise to reach financial close.


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    ESWATINI: GoParity co-finances off-grid solar power plant at Siteki Hospital

    The GoParity Impact Investment Platform will co-finance the construction of a solar photovoltaic power plant at the Good Shepherd Mission Hospital in Siteki, Eswatini. The projected solar power plant will enable the health centre to become more independent from the national electricity grid. SolarWood Hospital is the name of a solar energy project that will soon be built in Eswanti. The project, initiated by GoParity, a Portugal-based impact investment platform, will result in the construction of a solar photovoltaic power plant at the Good Shepherd Mission Hospital in Siteki, the capital of the Lubombo district. The hospital is currently powered by the national electricity grid, which is mainly fuelled by coal-fired power plants (76%). The hospital also uses this fossil fuel source to heat water, which is essential for the delivery of some health care services. GoParity’s solution through its SolarWood Hospital project is to disconnect the Good Shepherd Mission Hospital from the national grid and power it with energy from a solar photovoltaic power plant. Coal will be replaced by “certified biomass” for water heating. “The switch to solar power will reduce the hospital’s greenhouse gas emissions by 70%, avoiding the emission of 1,350.3 tons of CO2 per year, the equivalent of planting 61,377 trees,” GoParity says. According to the financing platform, which has more than 6,800 investors, the project will have a significant impact in the Lubombo district, one of Eswatini’s least developed districts.


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    TOGO: Biogas reference laboratory to be built at Lomé University


    The West African Centre for Scientific Services on Climate Change and Adapted Land Use (WASCAL) at the University of Lomé in Togo will soon be operating a biogas reference laboratory. The centre will serve to increase the share of renewable energies in the country's electricity mix, by developing the potential of these clean energies while respecting and preserving the environment. A new bioenergy project is underway in Togo. It concerns the construction of a laboratory that will serve as a research framework to improve biogas production in Togo. The facility will be opened at the West African Centre for Scientific Services on Climate Change and Adapted Land Use (WASCAL) at the University of Lomé. “The future laboratory will enable Togo’s enormous biomass potential to be further exploited through the development of research capacity and the demonstration of innovative biogas production technologies. It will also contribute to the development and adoption of improved stoves from Germany,” explains Komi Agboka, director of the WASCAL. The project to build the laboratory at the University of Lomé is the first component of the Programme for the Development of Renewable Energy in Togo (Pdert), which was officially launched on July 17, 2020. The country has already received financial support from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) for the implementation of the laboratory project, through the WASCAL and in collaboration with the German Biomass Research Centre.


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    SIERRA LEONE: InfraCo Africa finances Bumbuna II Hydroelectric Project with $6 million


    InfraCo Africa is supporting the implementation of the second phase of the Bumbuna Hydroelectric Project in Sierra Leone. The company belonging to the Private Infrastructure Development Group (PIDG) will finance this renewable energy project to the tune of $6 million. Joule Africa is taking another step in the financial leveraging for the implementation of the second phase of its Bumbuna hydropower project in Sierra Leone. InfraCo Africa, a company owned by Private Infrastructure Development Group (PIDG) is now one of the companies involved in this renewable energy project with an investment of $6 million. With an expected capacity of 143 MW, the Bumbuna II hydropower project is being developed on the Seli River, the same river on which the first phase of the Bumbuna hydropower project was developed and which to date has produced 50 MW of electricity. Bumbuna II is being developed by Joule Africa through the ad hoc company Seli Hydropower. InfraCo Africa’s financing brings Joule Africa closer to completing the financing of the future hydropower plant. “We are often called upon in the early stages to develop a concept or demonstrate a pioneering model, but, as in the case of Bumbuna Hydro II, we can also intervene at a later stage to help with the financial close and participate in the project steering committee, especially in these difficult times. Bumbuna Hydro II is expected to have an extremely positive impact, enabling sustainable economic development in Sierra Leone,” says Gilles Vaes, Managing Director of InfraCo Africa.


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    GHANA: Nek aims to produce 1,000 MW of wind power to boost the grid


    The Swiss company Nek has announced its plans to generate 1,000 MW of electricity from several wind farms in Ghana. The Independent Power Producer (IPP) believes that the implementation of this mega project is an incentive to implement the Ghanaian government's reforms in the renewable energy sector. Ghana could soon become one of Africa’s leading wind energy producers. This ambition is becoming a reality with the announcement by the Swiss company Nek to produce 1,000 MW of electricity over the next few years. According to this Independent Power Producer (IPP), the implementation of this mega project would support the implementation of Law 832 on the development of renewable energy in Ghana, notably through the creation of a fund to facilitate financing. Nek plans to implement its project in several phases. The first phase is expected to generate 160 MW, and 75 MW for the second phase. The Swiss company already has major concessions in Ghana. In the locality of Amlakpo, more than 80 km from the Ghanaian capital Accra, Nek wants to build a 200 MW wind farm on a plot of land of about 58 km².In the locality of Ayitepa in the south-east of Ghana, the company will develop a project for the construction of a 225 MW wind farm. Studies for the construction of this facility have been underway since 1998. Nek plans to sell the kWh of electricity generated by the Ayitepa wind farm to the state-owned Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG) at 8.9 cents. The implementation of Nek’s mega-wind project is expected to help diversify Ghana’s electricity mix, which is dominated by thermal power (close to 2,800 MW) generated by large fossil-fuel-fired power plants. Hydropower comes second with an installed capacity of 1,580 MW according to the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Hydropower production is, however, strongly affected by “changing hydrological conditions,” such as declining river flows.


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    EGYPT: Schneider Electric to upgrade power grid with digital technology


    The French industrial group Schneider Electric has been chosen by the Egyptian Electricity Holding Company (EEHC) for the construction of four control centres for the Egyptian electricity grid. The project, costing about $288 million, is designed to transform the Egyptian power grid into a smart grid as its capacity increases through new renewable energy generation facilities. While the Egyptian authorities are engaged in a policy to diversify the country’s electricity mix by injecting green energy into the grid, the state-owned Egyptian Electricity Holding Company (EEHC) is signing a contract with the French industrial group Schneider Electric to transform the Egyptian electricity grid into a smart grid. As part of its new contract, Schneider Electric will build four control centers that will monitor and optimise the power grid, as well as more than 12,000 smart grid main units that will be installed throughout the national grid. In the £4.6 billion ($287.5 million) contract, the company based in Rueil-Malmaison, France, will use its EcoStruxure Grid technology to “build a future-proof smart grid” that uses the power of digital technology to automate and enhance its operations.


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    BENIN: 11 companies selected for 8 mini-solar grids projects in rural areas


    Over 11 companies have been selected in a call for proposals from the Off-Grid Clean Energy Facility (OCEF) for the construction of 8 solar mini-grids. The initiative is supported by Millennium Challenge Account, through its Millennium Challenge Account-Benin II (MCA-Benin II) programme. In Benin, the results of the Off-Grid Clean Energy Facility (OCEF) call for projects are known. At least eight projects for the construction, maintenance and operation of mini-solar and energy efficiency grids have been selected for an overall investment of more than $69.5 million. These projects were proposed by 11 companies. Among these companies is Akuo Energy Africa, the subsidiary of the French company Akuo Energy, which has partnered with Power: On to propose a project for the construction, operation and maintenance of 10 hybrid solar mini-grids with a distribution network in 19 localities in the departments of Atacora and Donga in northern Benin. In the south of this West African country, a consortium formed by Energicity Corp and Comtel Sarl proposes the construction of 20 mini-solar grids to support the economic development of 20 localities in the departments of Zou, Couffo and Collines.


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    MAURITIUS: Bonds to finance sustainable development projects


    The Government of Mauritius is seriously considering allowing its central bank to borrow from donors to finance its sustainable development projects in several areas, including renewable energy. The news came a few days ago. The Mauritian government will soon allow its central bank to issue bonds or debenture loans from donors. The objective is to mobilise financial resources for sustainable development projects in Mauritius, particularly in the fields of renewable energy, the green economy and the blue economy. Mauritius plans, for example, to add 35% renewable energy to its electricity mix by 2025, compared to 22% in 2020 (1% wind and solar power and 5% hydropower). The remaining 16 per cent of “renewable energy” will be produced from sugarcane waste. The Mauritian government was forced to turn to this alternative because of the isolated nature of this island African state located in the western Indian Ocean. To limit air pollution by fossil fuels on the island, Mauritians have been experimenting for several years with the transformation of sugar cane into clean energy. Electricity is produced from bagasse, the dry pulpy residue left after the extraction of juice from sugar cane. If the country benefits from new donor funding, the project to produce electricity from sugarcane waste could see a quantum leap forward. Several solar and wind energy projects could also be considered by the Mauritian authorities.


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    CHAD: UNDP plans to equip 150 health centres with solar photovoltaic systems

    The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has recently launched a new solar energy project in Chad. It is called "Santé Soleil" (Healthy Sunshine). The first phase of the project, which aims to install solar panels in 150 health centres across the country, is designed to reduce the maternal mortality rate. The UNDP is funding the project with more than $3 million, or about 1.8 billion CFA francs. Since July 10, 2020, the health centre in Ngone-Ba, in the 9th district of the Chadian capital N’Djamena, has been equipped with a photovoltaic solar system. The community clinic was chosen by the Chadian government to serve as the framework for the launch of a new solar energy project initiated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in the country. Dubbed “Solar Health”, the project will be implemented in several phases. The first stage aims to electrify 150 health centres in Chad through the installation of solar panels. The United Nations (UN) development agency has released more than 3 million dollars, the equivalent of about 1.8 billion CFA francs, for the work to be carried out. “The solar systems will help improve health indicators and contribute to the fight against maternal and neonatal mortality,” said Stephen Kinloch Pichat, the UNDP deputy representative in Chad. Here


    Gambia Allocated U.S.$66 Million to Improve Electricity

    The ECOWAS Regional Electricity Access Project (ECOWAS-REAP), in partnership with World Bank has allocated US$66 million to The Gambia to improve access to electricity for its people. The ECOWAS Regional Electricity Access Project (ECOREAP) is a US$225 million programme providing funding to Gambia, Guinea Bissau and Mali. The Gambia is the only country that received a whole grant, which totaled US$66 million. This grant will provide extension to distribute the OMVG 225kv transmission line from the substations to be located in Soma and Brikama. It will cover all communities within 100km radius of the two substations. The project is sponsored by the World Bank and was negotiated in Abuja from 29 to 30 October 2018. This project was negotiated on behalf of The Gambia by the permanent secretary at the Ministry of Petroleum & Energy (MOPE), Mr. Lamin Camara, who led a delegation from the government together with officials from NAWEC, Ministries of Finance and Justice to the World Bank office in Abuja, Nigeria. This regional project will be implemented in different phases and is part of a programme covering 11 countries namely: Benin, Burkina Faso, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Togo, Mauritania and Chad.


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    TUNISIA: To integrate the International Solar Alliance (ASI)

    India wishes to include Tunisia among the members of the International Solar Alliance (ISA). This integration will mark the starting point for the strengthening of the Tunisian-Indian partnership in the solar energy field. The North African country intends to reduce its consumption of fossil fuels by 30% by 2030. Tunisia could join the International Solar Alliance (ISA) despite its non-statutory geographical position. Although its solar irradiation is not negligible (between 1800 and 2600 Kilowatt-hours per square metre per year), the country is not in the equatorial zone as is the case for the 121 members of the ISA. A geographical restriction that India intends to lift, in order to allow countries outside the equatorial zone, such as Tunisia, to join the solar energy promotion initiative. This reform project was announced on July 3, 2020 in Tunis by Puneet Kundal, India’s ambassador to Tunisia, who was received in audience by the Tunisian Minister of Energy, Mines and Energy Transition, Mongi Marzouk. During the exchanges, the two authorities expressed the mutual desire of their two countries to strengthen their partnership in the field of renewable energy. Tunisia is in fact preparing to launch major projects in the fields of photovoltaic solar energy and wind power, the aim being to reduce its fossil fuel energy consumption by 30% by 2030. Hence the support sought from India, the co-initiator country of the ISA.


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    MOROCCO/MAURITANIA: how solar and wind power are making a leap in electricity mixes

    The Ember think tank has recently published the results of a survey on the production and consumption of solar and wind energy in the world. The report reveals that Mauritania and Morocco are among the African countries with solar and wind energy production that occupy a significant share of their electricity generation. The production and consumption of solar and wind energy is increasing worldwide. It is the main point of a recent report by the Ember think tank. While Denmark tops the list with 55 per cent of its electricity generated from solar and wind power in 2019, Africa is also making progress in exploiting these clean energy sources. Thus, according to the Ember think tank, 24% of the electricity consumed in Mauritania will be produced from solar and wind power in 2019. This North African country has an installed electrical capacity of 486 MW. Solar energy plays an important role in the electricity mix with many power plants installed in the country.

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