AFREPREN/FWD - Energy, Environment and Development Network for Africa Website

 

Home l Site Map l Contact Us l

Energy News

Home

About Us

Focal Areas

Projects

Publications

Members

Energy News

Energy Events

Opportunities

Related Links

Picture Gallery

Contact Us

No. of Visitors to Website:

 
 
  • UGANDA: Amea Power to build four solar and wind farms in two regions
  • Sudan: Khartoum State - American Offers On Producing Cooking Gas From Wastes
  • Zimbabwe: Editorial Comment - Renewable Energy Policies Vital for Power Sustenance
  • CAMEROON: Hysacam to produce electricity from household waste soon
  • KENYA: GDC diversifies use of geothermal steam in western Kenya
  • SOUTH AFRICA: Multotec builds solar power plant for its Spartan plant
  • Renewables get a boost in Africa pledges
  • Uganda: Electricity Exports Grow
  • In Kenya, herders turn an invasive cactus into biofuel
  • AFRICA: DPA partners with Canadian Solar to provide off-grid for businesses
  • Nigeria: Govt Gets AfDB's $200 Million for Off-Grid Electricity
  • IVORY COAST: Eranove wraps up financing for its 390 MW power plant, Atinkou
  • MOROCCO: Azelio installs storage system in Noor’s solar complex
  • NAMIBIA: Government approves 4 wind power projects in Tsau//Khaeb Park
  • Mini-grids respond to the real need of easiness of installation
  • EGYPT: AAIB partners with Future Energy to provide solar home kits
  • ETHIOPIA: EEP signs EPC contract for Aluto Langano geothermal power plant
  • SOUTH AFRICA: Scatec Solar connects its second solar power plant to Upington
  • Zimbabwe: Zesa Tariff Structure Will Ensure Recovery
  • KENYA: KenGen to carry out new studies on the Akiira geothermal site

  • UGANDA: Amea Power to build four solar and wind farms in two regions

    The Ugandan government recently reached an agreement with Hussain bin Jassim Al-Nowais, head of Amea Power, an independent power producer (IPP) based in the United Arab Emirates. The IPP wants to build four solar and wind farms in two regions in Uganda. New renewable energy projects will be implemented in Uganda. It is the promise of a recently signed agreement between the chairman of Amea Power Hussain bin Jassim Al-Nowais and Ugandan head of state Yoweri Museveni. The agreement specifically covers the construction of four wind and solar farms in two regions of the country. In the West Nile region of northwestern Uganda, the Independent Power Producer (IPP) wants to build a 10 MWp solar photovoltaic power plant and a 10 MW wind farm. Amea Power wants to build the largest facility in the Karamoja region of northeastern Uganda. The UAE-based IPP wants to build a wind farm with a capacity of 120 MW. The solar power plant will be capable of supplying 80 MWp to the Ugandan electricity grid. The chairman of Amea Power Hussain bin Jassim Al-Nowais said that implementation of his project in the West Nile region will begin before January 2021. These new projects will enable Amea Power to increase its installed capacity on the African continent. In recent months, the UAE-based company has obtained several concessions from African governments.


    For More Information Click Here


    Sudan: Khartoum State - American Offers On Producing Cooking Gas From Wastes


    Khartoum — Khartoum State has been studying offers presented by US companies including establishment of factories for recycling wastes for producing cooking gas, fuels and cleaned power. Caretaker Wali of Khartoum State Gen. Ahmed Abdoon Hammad has directed formation of sub committees for studying assessing offers presented by the American companies that the committees are to submit their reports within a week prior to signature of executive protocols. Gen. Hammad said, while he was chairing a joint meeting that drew representatives of the US companies and the Secretary General of the Higher Council for Environment Dr Bushra Hamid Ahmed, that removal of environmental distortions, waste management are the state's top priorities. The meeting reaffirmed importance of the US companies offers particularly that related to setting up a factory with international standards for recycling wastes.


    For More Information Click Here


    Zimbabwe: Editorial Comment - Renewable Energy Policies Vital for Power Sustenance


    The launch of the National Renewable Energy Policy (NREP) and the Bio-fuels Policy of Zimbabwe represents a major milestone in our country's efforts to catalyse the transition to renewable energy -- a key step in the attainment of Strategic Development Goal (SDG) number 7, which seeks to ensure universal energy access to all.It is clear that Zimbabwe has the potential to lead Africa in scaling up and generating renewable energy. Already, the country is experiencing a growing uptake of renewable energy by both individual consumers, companies and mining entities. The launch of the two policies will bolster confidence among energy consumers, private sector investors and the Government as well as scaling up efforts to move towards greening our energy consumption. Access to renewable energy will certainly improve livelihoods, help small businesses to thrive and power essential services such as schools and clinics. We all know the crippling effects brought about by widespread electricity blackouts in the country.


    For More Information Click Here


    CAMEROON: Hysacam to produce electricity from household waste soon


    Hysacam, the household waste collection and treatment company in Cameroon, has announced three projects to generate electricity at its landfill sites. The power plant projects will generate an overall capacity of 72 MW. Sustainable cities and territories #26. Our series in partnership with the Africa-France 2020 Summit. The conversion of household waste into electrical energy will take place soon in Cameroon. Hysacam (Hygiène et salubrité du Cameroun) announced this on February 21, 2020 on its website. The operator, which ensures the collection and treatment of household waste in 17 Cameroonian towns, intends to develop three power stations from landfill sites. The first two plants are “Landfill Gas and Use” projects. Their operation is based on the use of landfill gas. This gas, after purification, will be conveyed to thermal engines coupled to an alternator. And it is at this level that electricity is produced. The power station in Yaoundé, the capital, will be located at the Nkolfoulou landfill to the west of the city. Its estimated capacity is 10 megawatts (MW), for 360,000 tonnes of landfilled waste per year. This will make it possible to connect an average of 580,000 households in Yaoundé and its surroundings. The second project will be located at the PK 10 landfill in Douala, the coastal region. Its capacity is estimated at 60 MW, due to 540,000 tons of waste buried per year. The third project will be located at the Bafoussam landfill in the West Cameroon region. With a capacity of 2 MW, this project is based on the biomethanization model. It is a technique whereby biodegradable material is extracted from household waste (75,000 tons per year) to integrate a controlled anaerobic digestion process in tanks called “oligotubes”. “The degraded material will produce combustible gas, the most predominant of which, methane (CH4), will be used in a heat engine coupled to an alternator to produce electricity,” explains Hysacam.


    For More Information Click Here


    KENYA: GDC diversifies use of geothermal steam in western Kenya


    The Geothermal Development Company (GDC) has recently commissioned a cereal drying plant in Menengai in the Rift Valley, western Kenya. Crops will be dried using geothermal steam. Geothermal energy is revolutionising agricultural practices in western Kenya. Now it is possible to dry cereals quickly and even in the rainy season. This is thanks to a drying plant that has just been commissioned in Menengai by the Geothermal Development Company (GDC). The plant is capable of drying 20 tons of grain per day. It should reduce production losses, which are often linked to bad weather during the rainy season. “We are pleased to see the progress of this project, which is unique in Africa. It shows that we can focus on other areas of geothermal energy use than electricity production,” says Agusta Gisladottir, Iceland’s Director of Regional Development Cooperation and Partnerships. The project on the application of geothermal energy in agriculture was funded by the Icelandic International Development Agency (Iceida). The state-owned company GDC is also developing pilot projects for the use of geothermal heat for milk pasteurisation and greenhouse agriculture in western Kenya.


    For More Information Click Here


    SOUTH AFRICA: Multotec builds solar power plant for its Spartan plant


    The South African subsidiary of Multotec has built a small solar power plant to supply electricity to its factory in the town of Spartan, near Johannesburg. The plant also supplies electricity to the local grid. Multotec wants to reduce its environmental impact in South Africa. The company, which specialises in the manufacture of equipment for the mining industry, has installed a small photovoltaic solar power plant at its plant in Spartan (near the city of Johannesburg). The power plant, built on its rooftop, consists of 684 solar panels and is capable of producing 223 kWp. “After months of planning and research, it was determined that we could operate a batteryless system that would significantly increase our current supply. After carrying out structural engineering work to prepare our designated roof areas, the panels were placed and efficiently connected as early as mid-November last year (2019),” explains Werner Stessl, Production Manager of the Multotec Group. According to this manager, the performance of the system – and even the output of each individual solar module – can be monitored daily on an online dashboard. The small solar power plant supplies 20 percent of the electricity needs of the Multotec plant. The new installation allows the company to reduce its environmental impact. Most importantly, the solar power plant saves Multotec’s electricity bills and provides electricity to the community. The power plant needs less electricity on weekends. At that time, the output from the small solar power plant is fed into the local power grid “at no cost to the municipality”.


    For More Information Click Here


    Renewables get a boost in Africa pledges


    Efforts to spur the use of renewable energy in Africa have received a boost with commitments for almost $160 million in financing targeted at small projects. The funding commitments were secured for the African Development Bank's Facility for Energy Inclusion. The bank said in a statement on Monday that the financing had been pledged by the European Commission, German state-development lender Kreditanstalt fur Wiederaufbau, the Clean Technology Fund, and Norfund, among other investors. The Facility for Energy Inclusion is a $400 million fund created to improve people's access to energy across Africa through support for small, independent power producers. The supply generated from renewable sources will be delivered to countries' central grids, minigrids and to what are known as captive power projects. Backed by the African Development Bank, the fund serves as a financing platform to catalyze financial support for innovative solutions to gaps in energy access in the continent. Priority will go to projects in sub-Saharan countries where rates of access to electricity are low compared with other regions. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, about half the people in sub-Saharan Africa have electricity and only a third use clean energy for cooking. Some 600 million people lack electricity and 890 million cook with traditional fuels. Thirteen countries south of the Sahara Desert have electricity access rates of less than 25 percent, compared to 1 percent for Asia, the intergovernmental economic organization said. The eligibility criteria for funding includes a requirement that the targeted projects use renewable energy sources, have capital expenditure of less than $30 million and a generation capacity of less than 25 megawatts.


    For More Information Click Here


    Uganda: Electricity Exports Grow

    Uganda's electricity export receipts increased by 13 per cent in the period ending January 2020, according to data from Bank of Uganda. Uganda exports its electricity to Kenya, Tanzania and parts of eastern DR Congo. According to a Bank of Uganda report released early this month, in the period between January 2019 and January 2020, Uganda exported about 320,372 megawatts of electricity, which earned the country Shs$46m (Shs170b). This was an improvement in the same period the previous year in which 228,808 megawatts worth $40m (Shs148b) were exported. Ms Pamela Nalwanga Byoruganda, the Uganda Electricity Transmission Company Limited (UETCL) public relations officer, at the weekend told Daily Monitor the increase in export earnings and volumes had been occasioned by "an increase in on the availability of generated power. Uganda's current installed electricity capacity stands at 1,252.4 megawatts. However consumption stands at slightly above 650 megawatts during peak hours, which creates a surplus of half of what is generated. At least by the end of 2020, Uganda's generation capacity is expected to grow to 1,681 megawatts. As of April 2019, national generation capacity was 1,177 megawatts. Much of the surplus is exported to Kenya, Tanzania, South Sudan and DR Congo through UETCL. UETCL is in charge of bulk electricity supplies for both the local and export markets. In October last year, Kenya indicated it had increased its power imports from Uganda due to a reduction in tariffs from Shs787.3 to Shs501 per unit. Kenya's Energy Cabinet Secretary Charles Keter said at the time the sharp growth in electricity imports from Uganda had been informed by a tariff reduction of about 50 per cent. The Muhoroni generator which largely supplies the region is Shs1,252.6 per unit compared to Uganda's which was Shs787.3 per unit before June and is now Shs501 per unit," he said. Mr Keter also revealed that the tariff is expected to reduce further to Shs357.8 at the end of October, adding that this, being hydro power: "Gives us [Kenya] a lot of stability in the region even as demand continues to rise." Step in the right direction

    For More Information Click Here


    In Kenya, herders turn an invasive cactus into biofuel

    The prickly pear cactus has taken over thousands of hectares of grazing land in arid parts of Kenya. Now herders, NGOs and scientists are teaming up to fight back against the prickly menance that's deadly to livestock. The early morning sun shines across Kenya's vast Laikipia plateau. Trailing behind his sheep and goats, Jackson Mukorino must navigate a thorny cactus thicket in search of the native shrubs and grasses his animals need to feed. The invasive Opuntia stricta, or prickly pear, was introduced to Kenya by British colonialists as an ornamental plant. It thrives in arid conditions, aggressively choking grasses and other shrubs. Over the past half century, as temperatures and dry spells have increased, it's become a serious problem for herders like Mukorino. The cactus bears a sweet purple fruit. But its spines are dangerous for livestock, blinding them, or damaging tongues and digestive systems, making it difficult for them to eat. Mukorino, a father-of-five who lives on the communally managed Makurian Group Ranch, lost half his 200-strong herd after they fed on the plant. "I have to always check on my animals' eyes to pick spines before releasing them to forage," Mukorino told DW, adding that several of his neighbors, similarly dependent on livestock for their livelihoods, have moved because of the threat.


    For More Information Click Here


    AFRICA: DPA partners with Canadian Solar to provide off-grid for businesses

    Canadian Solar, a company specialising in the manufacture of photovoltaic panels and solar energy components, recently signed a contract with Distributed Power Africa (DPA), a solar off-grid supplier. The agreement covers the supply of solar off-grids with a combined capacity of 25 MW to businesses in Africa. The off-grid supplier Distributed Power Africa (DPA) and Canadian Solar, a company specialising in the manufacture of photovoltaic panels and components for solar energy, have entered into an agreement for the supply of solar of grids with a cumulative capacity of 25 MW to businesses in Africa. This partnership is expected to increase the development of solar energy solutions in several African countries. More than 60,000 Canadian Solar KuMax and HiKu photovoltaic panels will be made available to the off-grid supplier DPA. The DPA Solar Systems will be deployed to companies in Kenya, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Lesotho, with the intention of expanding to other key markets in Africa. “The partnership will ensure zero technological risk for DPA customers because of the long warranty and reliability of the equipment,” says Canadian Solar.


    For More Information Click Here


    Nigeria: Govt Gets AfDB's $200 Million for Off-Grid Electricity

    Abuja — The Rural Electricity Agency (REA) yesterday officially launched its $200 million Nigeria Electrification Project (NEP) which it said would be deployed in providing 500,000 Nigerians in 105,000 rural households with off-grid electricity commencing in the next five months. The funds, which were sourced from the African Development Bank (AfDB), the agency said, would also enable eight universities and 20,000 micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) to get access to reliable sources of energy as well as to stop the emission of 1.69 million tons of dangerous substances into the environment. Managing Director of REA, Mr. Ahmad Salihijo, who stated this during the event in Abuja, said the project remains the largest single investment stream in Nigeria's off-grid sector addressing the energy access challenge through mini-grids, the solar home systems and the Energising Education Programme (EEP) of the federal government. The Chief Executive Office of the agency noted that four components are currently structured under the facility namely: Solar Hybrid Mini Grids under the minimum subsidy tender (MST), which will cost $70 million; Energy-Efficient Appliances for Productive Use, $20 million; phase three of the Energising Education Programme, $100 million, and technical assistance and capacity building which is $10 million. "NEP-AfDB will contribute to more than 500,000 Nigerians in 105,000 households in off-grid or underserved communities, having access to electricity, an increase of 76.5 MW in installed power generation capacity (of which, 68 MW will be from solar generation alone) "Eight universities obtaining access to reliable sources of energy; 20,000 micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) either supported by or supplied with productive use appliances and equipment; and the avoidance of 1.69 million tons of CO2 emissions in line with the Nigeria's commitment to combatting climate change," he said.

    For More Information Click Here


    IVORY COAST: Eranove wraps up financing for its 390 MW power plant, Atinkou

    The pan-African group Eranove has just signed several financing agreements relating to its project to build a combined cycle power plant in Jacqueville, Ivory Coast. The facility, which will be built as part of a public-private partnership (PPP), will inject 390 MW into the Ivorian national power grid. Sustainable cities and territories #17. Our series in partnership with the Africa-France 2020 Summit. An important milestone has been attained in the project for the construction of a power plant in Jacqueville, located some 40 km from the city of Abidjan in Ivory Coast. It is the financial closure for the construction of the Atinkou power plant. Several financing agreements have been signed between the project developer, the pan-African group Eranove; the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the World Bank Group’s private sector financing arm; and the government of Ivory Coast. Financial mobilisation was carried out by the IFC from the African Development Bank (AfDB); the Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW), the German development agency; the Netherlands Development Finance Corporation (FMO); the Emerging Africa Infrastructure Fund (EAIF); as well as the Fund for International Development (OPEC Fund).

    For More Information Click Here


    MOROCCO: Azelio installs storage system in Noor’s solar complex

    A thermodynamic solar energy storage system was inaugurated on March 5, 2020 at the Noor Ouarzazate solar complex in Morocco. The project of the Moroccan Agency for Sustainable Energy (Masen) was carried out by the Swedish company Azelio. The solar complex of Noor Ouarzazate now has a storage system. It has recently been inaugurated by Azelio, the Swedish company that won the contract for the installation of its storage technology. The ceremony took place in the presence of officials from the Moroccan Agency for Sustainable Energy (Masen), which is at the origin of the project. Azelio has installed a system that allows Noor’s Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plant to provide electricity 24 hours a day. “A phase change material (PCM) is heated up to 600°C and liquefied in a container. During discharge, heat is transferred from the PCM to the Stirling engine via a heat transfer fluid (HTF). A gas is heated and cooled by the surrounding air, and thus drives the engine,” explains Azelio. The storage system installed in the Noor complex uses recycled aluminium as the storage medium. In other words, the system is free of rare minerals and will not suffer a reduction in storage capacity over time. Azelio’s system is thus capable of storing between 100 kW to 100 MWh of electricity. The Swedish company plans to complete the final storage checks before the end of the first quarter of 2020 for commissioning before the end of the year. “Being present on one of the world’s largest renewable energy scenes is a big step for Azelio and is the platform from which we will become a global industrial player,” says Jonas Eklind, Azelio’s CEO.


    For More Information Click Here


    NAMIBIA: Government approves 4 wind power projects in Tsau//Khaeb Park

    The Namibian government has recently given its approval for the development of 4 wind farms in the Tsau//Khaeb National Park (Sperrgebiet). The facilities will be built by the state-owned company NamPower and two independent power producers (IPPs). Sustainable cities and territories #15. Our series in partnership with the Africa-France 2020 Summit. The decision is both a source of enthusiasm and concern for environmental activists in Namibia. The government of this southern African country has approved the implementation of four wind power projects in the centre of the Tsau//Khaeb (Sperrgebiet) National Park, located near the coast in the south-west of the country. Two of these wind projects are being carried out by the state-owned company NamPower. The construction of the first wind farm will require an investment of N$1 billion (about US$68 million). The facility will consist of 16 turbines that will turn on coastal wind while producing 40 MW. NamPower’s second wind farm will have a capacity of 50 MW. The other two wind farms will be built by independent power producers (IPPs).


    For More Information Click Here


    Mini-grids respond to the real need of easiness of installation

    Over 3,000 mini-grids are expected to be built by end-2022 in Africa and Asia, according to a new report, Mini-grids for Village Electrification: Industry and African & Asian markets analysis – 2020 Edition, issued by Infinergia. The research company analysed the recent developments of this market in over 20 African and 11 Asian countries. 2019’s announcements confirm the place of mini-grids as a complementary solution to solar home systems in the electrification process of remote populations. The report noted that national policies (e.g. Kenyan Energy Act or Ethiopian National Electrification Program) and private initiatives (e.g. Tata’s announcement for 10,000 new mini-grids in India) give high expectations for this market. However, field installations are not following as fast as public announcements. Less than 150 new installations have been announced as completed in 2019. Compared to the published tenders and announcements made from 2016 to 2018 many projects are still pending or in construction while some of them are cancelled due to regulatory delays in some countries.


    For More Information Click Here


    EGYPT: AAIB partners with Future Energy to provide solar home kits

    The Arab-African International Bank (AAIB) has recently launched a programme to help individuals install solar kits in their homes. This financing programme is conducted in partnership with the company Future Energy. What is the best way to enable individuals to easily install solar home systems in Egypt? This is the main purpose of a financing programme that has been initiated by the Arab-African International Bank (AAIB). The actions will be carried out in partnership with the solar energy supplier Future Energy. Over a large part of the African continent, particularly south of the Sahara, solar home kits provide access to electricity. In Egypt, these systems allow some households to “reduce their electricity expenses in the long term by buying sustainable solutions that produce their own electricity at home”, as AAIB points out. AAIB’s new programme enables its customers to obtain financing for the acquisition of solar home systems. In concrete terms, the financing covers the expenses related to the purchase and installation of solar panels. The individual can repay the loan through “flexible payments” over a period of 84 months. Overall, the bank’s customers can thus lend up to a maximum of 2 million Egyptian pounds (around 128,000 dollars). According to the AAIB, its solar home systems financing programme also aims to support the Egyptian government’s policy of producing 20 per cent of the electricity consumed in the country from renewable energy sources. As part of this policy, large power generation facilities are under construction in Egypt. An example is the Benban solar complex in the governorate of Aswan. The solar parks of this complex will have a cumulative capacity of 1 650 MW.


    For More Information Click Here


    ETHIOPIA: EEP signs EPC contract for Aluto Langano geothermal power plant

    Three companies have been selected by Ethiopian Electric Power (EEP) for the construction of the Aluto Langano geothermal power plant in central Ethiopia. The plant will have a capacity of 5 MW. The Aluto Langano small geothermal project has taken another step forward. The state-owned Ethiopian Electric Power (EEP) has selected three companies to implement the project in central Ethiopia. These are the Japanese companies Toshiba Energy Systems & Solutions Corporation and Toyota Tsusho Corporation, and the Turkish engineering company Egesim Energy Electro-Mechanic Construction Contracting Co. The three companies have signed an engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contract for the geothermal power plant with the state-owned EEP. Under the agreement, Toshiba will provide a small-scale geothermal power generation system consisting of steam turbines. Egesim Energy was responsible for the construction of the Aluto Langano geothermal power plant.


    For More Information Click Here


    SOUTH AFRICA: Scatec Solar connects its second solar power plant to Upington

    A new 86 MWp photovoltaic solar power plant has recently been commissioned at the Upington Complex in the Northern Cape in South Africa. It was built by the Independent Power Producer (IPP) Scatec Solar. The Upington complex in the North Cape Province of South Africa is being expanded with a new photovoltaic solar power plant. This is Dyason’s Klip 1 solar power plant recently commissioned by Scatec Solar, an independent power producer (IPP) in Norway. The 86 MWp facility is one of three solar power plants being built by Scatec Solar and its partners in the Upington complex. The partners are Norfund, a Norwegian government private equity company with an 18% stake; H1 Holdings, a South African investment company wholly owned by black people, with 35%; and Upington’s surrounding community with 5%. According to Scatec Solar, Dyason’s Klip 1 solar power plant is capable of supplying 40,000 South African homes with electricity. The IPP also says the new facility, “will earn 60% of the tariff until the commercial operation date in mid-March”. When completed, Upington’s solar complex will provide clean energy to around 120,000 homes and avoid carbon dioxide emissions of more than 600,000 tonnes a year.


    For More Information Click Here


    Zimbabwe: Zesa Tariff Structure Will Ensure Recovery

    The automatic raising of Zesa tariffs last week by 19 percent is part of the major change dating from October last year to ensure that even the truncated electricity supply we now get continues. It is also meant to ensure that over the next few years, Zesa expands to meet growing national requirements. For what happened five months ago was part of the economic reforms Zimbabwe had to put in place to first stop the rot and now start growing the real productive economy. For three decades, electricity tariffs had been set or approved by politicians currying favour with the electorate, rather than by accountants working out the true cost of a unit of electricity. The result is there every day -- the swinging load-shedding we all have to endure. A lot is said about the regional droughts that reduced flows in the Zambezi River and thus have forced Zesa to cut back generation considerably at Kariba South Hydro Power Station. What is not stressed are three other facts: Hwange Thermal Power Station is running at half design output, there is no second large thermal station and there is no major solar station feeding Zesa's grid. Hwange Thermal limps along because tariffs were continually set too low to allow Zesa to maintain the station properly, maintenance that would include replacing major equipment as it wore out. The second major thermal station, planned since the late 1980s, has never been built either by Zesa or by a private generator because Zesa needed a higher tariff to either service the required loan or to pay the independent generator enough so they get a positive return on their investment.


    For More Information Click Here


    KENYA: KenGen to carry out new studies on the Akiira geothermal site

    The Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen) has been selected to carry out new geoscientific studies for the Akiira geothermal project in the Rift Valley in western Kenya. Akiira is a renewable energy project developed by a consortium of several investors and is facing some challenges. Is the Akiira geothermal project viable? Once again, a geoscientific study should provide an answer to this question. The geothermal energy developer Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen) has just been given the task of carrying out these geoscientific studies. KenGen’s new contract will be to collect additional data for the project developer. It is the ad hoc company Akiira Geothermal owned by a consortium consisting of Centum Investments Company, Marine Power Generation, DI Frontier Energy Carbon Fund (a Danish energy fund) and Ram Energy. KenGen plans to provide the first results of its field research by March 2020.


    For More Information Click Here




    This website is best displayed in Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari and Opera browsers
    AFREPREN/FWD © 2017